Sanford-Brown Blogs

Interested in healthcare but don't want to work with patients? A medical billing and coding diploma is for you

April 6, 2009 0 Comments

Doctors and nurses aren't the only ones helping people who are sick or in need. Doctors, insurance companies and nurses rely on medical billing and coding technicians for correct information about a patient's medical history and accurate billing to help them perform their jobs well. Medical records managers and medical records clerks note the diagnosis and treatment of each patient in the patient's individual file, which is used by doctors, nurses and insurance companies to provide proper healthcare.

Those who have completed medical billing courses, who work as medical office billers, billing clerks or billing representatives, also work with insurance companies to insure that doctors' offices are reimbursed properly for the care they provide to patients. Medical billers, medical records managers and medical records clerks and coding technicians do not interact with patients and may even have opportunities to work from home. A medical billing diploma can help you prepare for this important and fulfilling career.

Make a Difference as a Medical Billing and Coding Technician
Medical billing and coding technicians play a role in every patient's experience in doctors' offices, hospitals, or nursing homes across America. Those who have completed medical billing and coding courses become well versed in medical procedures so they can accurately record diagnoses and correctly bill insurance companies. Those who enroll in medical billing and coding courses will also use learned computer skills to help accurately manage medical files and bills. Without proper documentation of prior medical history, doctors and nurses can endanger the well being of their patients. Medical records managers and medical records clerks play a crucial role in helping doctors provide proper medical care to their patients.

Where to Work with a Medical Coding and Medical Billing Diploma
Individuals who have completed medical billing and coding courses often target employment in doctors' offices, nursing homes, outpatient care facilities and hospitals. The largest single group of medical billing and coding technicians work in hospitals. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 40% of medical billing and coding technicians work in hospitals. Some, well trained medical office billers, billing clerks or billing representatives, also work from home. Those who have completed medical billing courses and have obtained a medical billing and coding diploma may be particularly well suited for these types of positions.

Jobs for Medical Billers and Coders Today and Tomorrow
Participate in the largest industry in America as a medical billing and coding technician. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that there will be an 18% increase in jobs for medical billing and coding technicians between 2006 and 2016. As the baby-boomer generation ages and requires more medical procedures and doctors visits, the opportunities for those with a medical billing and coding diploma are expected to increase.

Enrolling in a Medical Billing and Coding Diploma Program?
Individuals with a medical billing and coding diploma, who have completed medical billing courses and medical coding courses, should be prepared to seek entry-level positions in the medical billing and coding field. Sanford-Brown College-Collinsville (SBC) offers courses in: billing practices and systems, coding and reimbursement systems, data abstracting, health record maintenance, and healthcare computer applications. The SBC Medical Billing and Coding Diploma program also includes a supervised clinical externship to give students hands-on real life experience in the work field. To learn more about our medical billing and coding program click here.

Sanford-Brown College - Collinsville is close to many locations:
Alton, IL - approximately 21.6 miles
Edwardsville, IL - approximately 12 miles
Granite City, IL - approximately 8.4 miles
Madison, IL - approximately 11.2 miles

Sources:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition, Medical Records and Health Information Technicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos103.htm (visited February 06, 2009).

http://medicalcoding-schools.info/employment

Comments

What do you think?

 
 
 

Categories

Archives

Terms and Conditions

By providing your mobile number, you agree to receive text messages from Sanford-Brown via its mobile text message provider.  You may opt out of receiving messages by texting the word STOP to 94576, or simply reply with the word STOP to any text message you receive from Sanford-Brown.

While CEC or its mobile text message provider will not charge end users for receiving/responding to promotional messages, depending on the terms of your mobile phone plan, you may incur a cost from your mobile service carrier to receive and respond to any promotional text messages (standard messaging and data rates/fees and other charges may apply).  Charges will appear on your mobile phone bill or will be deducted from pre-paid amounts.  Current participating/supported carriers are: Alltel, AT&T, Boost, Cellcom, Cellular One, Cellular South, Cincinnati Bell, Cricket, Element Wireless, Golden State Cellular, iWireless, Metro PCS, Nextel, nTelos, Plateau Wireless, Sprint, T-Mobile, US Cellular, Verizon Wireless, Viaero Wireless, Virgin, and more.